top of page

Codes, Standards, and Specifications that apply to Construction

BUILDING CODES  |  LOCAL JURISDICTION STANDARDS  |  THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA)

Logo:  International Code Council

BUILDING CODES PUBLISHED BY THE INTERNATIONAL CODE COUNCIL

The City or County you live in has adopted versions of the IBC (International Building Code) and the IRC (International Residential Code).  In addition, there are numerous codes and specifications referenced by both the IBC and IRC, such as the International Mechanical Code (IMC), International Fire Code (IFC), and Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).


These codes are updated every three years.  However, governing bodies have discretion on which dated version they adopt and when.  For example, it might be 2022, but your city or county is still under the adopted 2018 Building Code.  Each jurisdiction is different.  Check with your local Building Department for the IBC and IRC versions applicable to your area. 


You can search for a specific code topic here.  Building code publications are available from the International Code Council at https://shop.iccsafe.org

Municipal Building

LOCAL JURISDICTIONS

City and County construction standards and specifications, which are published and adopted by cities, counties, and districts, include guidelines on drainage design, utility design, and street design.  These publications are typically available for free download on your city's or county's website.

Some areas are within special water, sanitary, or stormwater management districts.  Publications regarding standards and specifications applicable to these districts are typically available for free download on the District's website.

Logo:  American with Disabilities Act

ADA DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became law in 1990 and was amended in 2009.  It is a civil rights law, not a building code, that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places open to the general public.

 

Title III of this law applies to public accommodations which cover privately-owned, leased, or operated facilities, such as common areas owned by the HOA.

 

Professional engineers and architects are required to follow the ADA Standards for Accessible Design in conjunction with local building codes for the design, construction, and alteration of sites, buildings, and facilities to accommodate the use and access needs of disabled individuals.

 

All homeowners who are members of a Homeowner's Association (HOA) should be knowledgeable about the ADA.  Common spaces owned by the HOA can be associated with significant liability as related to ADA design and maintenance requirements. 

 

The 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design publication is available at  https://archive.ada.gov/regs2010/2010ADAStandards/2010ADAStandards.pdf

bottom of page